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Poster: Kevin Marks Date: Sep 2, 2003 9:47pm
Forum: movies Subject: Dyke's speech in full

http://www.digitalspy.co.uk/article/ds11598.html

Less wide-ranging than the BBC report:
"We intend to allow parts of our programmes, where we own the rights, to be available to anyone in the UK to download so long as they don't use them for commercial purposes."

I hope they realise that trying to restrict to the UK is technically infeasible and just plain silly.

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Poster: rgs_uk Date: Nov 21, 2003 1:49pm
Forum: movies Subject: Re: Dyke's speech in full

It would be extremely easy to restrict downloads to people who are in the UK. Anyone who has a TV receiver (TV, VCR or PCTV card) in their property in the UK has to buy an annual TV licence. This income funds the BBC. So they could simply use a database of all TV licence holders, only allow downloads to those people who input the full name and address of the licence holder and confirm with an e-mail to that person. IMO the BBC will do everything possible to not make the archive available outside of the UK, as they get increasing income from international programme sales, DVDs and their own channels such as BBC World. The idea is that the British public has already paid for the programmes through the licence fee and should be entitled to use the material. However, people outside of the UK have not contributed.

It seems unlikely that we shall see comedy or drama productions available in an online archive due to the complex rights issues involved (for example, actors on British TV have usually been paid for each showing of a programme rather than a one-off fee). So it will probably only be factual: news, documentaries and educational. Which are not likely to appeal so much to the file sharers anyway ;-)

This post was modified by rgs_uk on 2003-11-21 21:49:01

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Poster: Kevin Marks Date: Nov 21, 2003 4:56pm
Forum: movies Subject: Re: Dyke's speech in full

They could do all that; but what would it gain them? The World Service is funded by the Foreign Office to indirectly promote the tolerance and fairness that epitomises the British self-image; could not the sharing of this bedrock of 20th century British culture with the rest of the world not outweigh any monetary gain?

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Poster: rgs_uk Date: Nov 21, 2003 5:35pm
Forum: movies Subject: Re: Dyke's speech in full

That's a good point about the World Service. Though even now there is a debate about the licence fee being used to provide a massive website (BBC Online) that is available worldwide. Personally I think BBC Online is a wonderful resource. But maybe the Foreign Office should pay the bandwidth bill for international users ;-)

I think comedy and drama shows are quite unlikely to be made available online even in the UK and very unlikely internationally because it would hit the income it brings in and, increasingly, the BBC needs to find income other than the licence fee. Again, I think the Government would have to fund any international use. The bandwidth costs would be phenomenal. But I agree with you that it would be a good thing in theory.

I heard that the BBC was trying to come up with some way to make BBC Online a commercial service (eg. with ads) for international users. Maybe by the time the archive project happens, the technology will be available to do that?

This post was modified by rgs_uk on 2003-11-22 01:35:00